ARC Review: You Were Here

Title: You Were Here
Author: Cori McCarthy
Illustrator: Sonia Liao
Rating: 
Genre: Fiction, Contemporary, (Young Adult)
Pages: 267
Published: March 1, 2016
House: Sourcebooks Fire
Format: E-book
Source: NetGalley

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Goodreads Synopsis:
Grief turned Jaycee into a daredevil, but can she dare to deal with her past?

On the anniversary of her daredevil brother’s death, Jaycee attempts to break into Jake’s favorite hideout—the petrifying ruins of an insane asylum. Joined by four classmates, each with their own brand of dysfunction, Jaycee discovers a map detailing her brother’s exploration and the unfinished dares he left behind.

As a tribute to Jake, Jaycee vows to complete the dares, no matter how terrifying or dangerous. What she doesn’t bargain on is her eccentric band of friends who challenge her to do the unthinkable: reveal the parts of herself that she buried with her brother.

My Thoughts:

This was given to me by Sourcebooks Fire via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Read More »

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Book Review: Don’t Forget the Couscous

Title: Don’t Forget the Couscous
Author: mir Darwish
Rating: 
Genre: poetry
Pages: 80
Published by: Smokestack Books
First Published: October 1st, 2015
Format: E-book
Source: NetGalley (in exgange for honest review)

Goodreads Synopsis:

Don’t Forget the Couscous is a book of poetry about exile and home, love and loss. It is a beautiful love-song to the Arab world – Syria, Kurdistan, Morocco, Palestine and his native Aleppo. It is a memoir of the failed Arab Spring and the civil-war that has turned his native Syria into a ‘fountain of blood’. It’s a bitter account of the demonization of Islam in the West, and the violent interference of the West in the Islamic world. It is about being a Muslim and not a terrorist.

Amir Darwish draws on the magical-realism of Naguib Mahfouz, the social satire of Muhammad al-Maghut and the love poetry of Rumi to describe the experience of Islam in Europe – from ‘a Friday night doner kebab after a good night out’ to a ‘girl who has taken off the hijab in order to feel safe’ and ‘a mosque with broken windows’. It is a book about travel and love, and an apology on behalf of Muslims everywhere for having contributed nothing to the modern world except astronomy, coffee, clocks, algebra, falafels, apricots and doner kebabs. And don’t forget the couscous…

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Book Review: Throne of Glass

Title: Throne of Glass
Author: Sarah J. Maas
Rating:
Genre: Fantasy, (Young Adult)
Pages: 404
Published by: Bloomsbury
First Published: August 2, 2012
Format: Paperback
Source: Personal Perchase

Goodreads Synopsis:

Meet Celaena Sardothien.
Beautiful. Deadly.
Destined for greatness.

In the dark, filthy salt mines of Endovier, an eighteen-year-old girl is serving a life sentence. She is a trained assassin, the best of her kind, but she made a fatal mistake: she got caught.

Young Captain Westfall offers her a deal: her freedom in return for one huge sacrifice. Celaena must represent the prince in a to-the-death tournament—fighting the most gifted thieves and assassins in the land. Live or die, Celaena will be free. Win or lose, she is about to discover her true destiny. But will her assassin’s heart be melted?

 

Plot Overview:

Caelena Sardothien, fresh from the death camp Endovier has to compete in competition to earn her freedom. There is a Test every week to determine if the competitors go back to where they came from or move on to the next round. Caelena, emaciated and out of shape needs to train and familiarized herself with her skills again. She is determined not to go back to Endovier. She won’t last another winter.

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Book Review: An Abundance of Katherines

Title: An Abundance of Katherines
Author: John Green
Rating:
Genre: Young-Adult, Contemporary
Pages: 236
Published By: Speak
First Published: September 21, 2006
Format: Paperback
Source: Personal Purchase


Goodreads Synopsis:

19 Katherines and counting…
When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton’s type is girls named Katherine. And when it comes to girls named Katherine, Colin is always getting dumped. Nineteen times, to be exact. On a road trip miles from home, this anagram-happy, washed-up child prodigy has ten thousand dollars in his pocket, a bloodthirsty feral hog on his trail, and an overweight, Judge Judy-loving best friend riding shotgun – but no Katherines. Colin is on a mission to prove The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability, which he hopes will predict the future of any relationship, avenge Dumpees everywhere, and finally win him the girl.

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