Comic Book Review: Giant Days

Title: Giant Days
Author: John Allison
Artists: Lissa Treiman, Whitney Cogar (Colors)
Rating: 
Genre: Contemporary, Fiction, (Comic Book)
Pages: 128
Published: November 24th, 2015
House: BOOM! Box
Format: E-book
Source: Borrowed

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Goodreads:
Susan, Esther, and Daisy started at university three weeks ago and became fast friends. Now, away from home for the first time, all three want to reinvent themselves. But in the face of handwringing boys, “personal experimentation,” influenza, mystery mold, nuchauvinism, and the willful, unwanted intrusion of “academia,” they may be lucky just to make it to spring alive. Collects issues #1-4.

My Thoughts:

I wasn’t a huge fan of this in the beginning. It wasn’t that I didn’t like it; it’s just that with all the things I heard from it I was expecting…more? But by the time I read issue #2 I loved it! So if you feel like that in the beginning keep reading; just give it some time.Read More »

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ARC Review: Movie Game

Title: Movie Game
Author: Michael Ebner
Rating:
Genre: Fiction, (Young Adult)
Pages: 302
Published: September 15, 2015
House: Pen and Picture
Format: E-book
Source: NetGalley

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Goodreads Synopsis:

It’s been three years since Joe’s father vanished. Now seventeen, he is unaware that government agents are watching him in case his dad makes contact. Joe is too distracted by his secret girlfriend, midnight swims in the pools of strangers, free drinks from his buddies at the movie game and the glamorous college student, Felicity. But his movie-esque existence and addiction to fiction is set to collide with a heavy dose of reality this summer when he discovers everything is not what it seems: his secret girlfriend wants to be the real thing. His college fling may have ulterior motives. And the government agents want co-operation to catch his missing father. All this and the three year old death of Joe’s first girlfriend Alice are going to cause him to face some dark truths.
It’s no longer a movie game. This is his life and he wants to win.

My Thoughts:

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ARC Review: You Were Here

Title: You Were Here
Author: Cori McCarthy
Illustrator: Sonia Liao
Rating: 
Genre: Fiction, Contemporary, (Young Adult)
Pages: 267
Published: March 1, 2016
House: Sourcebooks Fire
Format: E-book
Source: NetGalley

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Goodreads Synopsis:
Grief turned Jaycee into a daredevil, but can she dare to deal with her past?

On the anniversary of her daredevil brother’s death, Jaycee attempts to break into Jake’s favorite hideout—the petrifying ruins of an insane asylum. Joined by four classmates, each with their own brand of dysfunction, Jaycee discovers a map detailing her brother’s exploration and the unfinished dares he left behind.

As a tribute to Jake, Jaycee vows to complete the dares, no matter how terrifying or dangerous. What she doesn’t bargain on is her eccentric band of friends who challenge her to do the unthinkable: reveal the parts of herself that she buried with her brother.

My Thoughts:

This was given to me by Sourcebooks Fire via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Read More »

Book Review: Station Eleven


Title: 
Station Eleven

Author: Emily St. John Mandel
Rating: 
Genre: Fiction, Dystopia, Adult
Pages: 339
Published: January 1st, 2014
House: Picador
Format: Paperback
Source: Personal Purchase

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Goodreads Synopsis:

An audacious, darkly glittering novel set in the eerie days of civilization’s collapse, Station Eleven tells the spellbinding story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity.

One snowy night Arthur Leander, a famous actor, has a heart attack onstage during a production of King Lear. Jeevan Chaudhary, a paparazzo-turned-EMT, is in the audience and leaps to his aid. A child actress named Kirsten Raymonde watches in horror as Jeevan performs CPR, pumping Arthur’s chest as the curtain drops, but Arthur is dead. That same night, as Jeevan walks home from the theater, a terrible flu begins to spread. Hospitals are flooded and Jeevan and his brother barricade themselves inside an apartment, watching out the window as cars clog the highways, gunshots ring out, and life disintegrates around them.

Fifteen years later, Kirsten is an actress with the Traveling Symphony. Together, this small troupe moves between the settlements of an altered world, performing Shakespeare and music for scattered communities of survivors. Written on their caravan, and tattooed on Kirsten’s arm is a line from Star Trek: “Because survival is insufficient.” But when they arrive in St. Deborah by the Water, they encounter a violent prophet who digs graves for anyone who dares to leave.

Spanning decades, moving back and forth in time, and vividly depicting life before and after the pandemic, this suspenseful, elegiac novel is rife with beauty. As Arthur falls in and out of love, as Jeevan watches the newscasters say their final good-byes, and as Kirsten finds herself caught in the crosshairs of the prophet, we see the strange twists of fate that connect them all. A novel of art, memory, and ambition, Station Eleven tells a story about the relationships that sustain us, the ephemeral nature of fame, and the beauty of the world as we know it.

My Thoughts:

Though I gave this book a 3.5 rating (which is still a good rating. See my rating system.)I was just a bit disappointed because I wanted to enjoy this a lot more than I did.Read More »

Book Review: The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Title: Ocean at the End of the Lane
Author: Neil Gaiman
Rating: 
Genre: Fantasy, Paranormal, YA/Adult Fiction
Pages: 181
Published by: Harper Collins
First Published: June 18, 2013
Format: Paperback
Source: Personal Perchase

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn’t thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she’d claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

A groundbreaking work from a master, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is told with a rare understanding of all that makes us human, and shows the power of stories to reveal and shelter us from the darkness inside and out. It is a stirring, terrifying, and elegiac fable as delicate as a butterfly’s wing and as menacing as a knife in the dark

My Thoughts:

Neil Gaiman accomplished so much in this 181 stand alone fantasy. A good fantasy standalone is impressive, a good fantasy standalone thats under 200 pages is even more impressive. This isn’t a kingdoms-and-swords kind of fantasy, it falls on the paranormal side of things. It’s hard to determine what age group this was written for; while the story does follow a 7 year old boy, it’s told as a memory of his adult self and there are a couple of scenes thrown in that makes one thing certain: it isn’t one of Gaiman’s middle grade books.Read More »

Book Review: Gone Girl

Title: Gone Girl
Author: Gillian Flynn
Rating: 
Genre: Adult Fiction, Mystery, Thriller
Pages: 475
Published by: Phoenix
First Published: 2012
Format: Paperback
Source: borrowed 

Goodreads Synopsis:

Who are you?
What have we done to each other?

These are the questions Nick Dunne finds himself asking on the morning of his fifth wedding anniversary, when his wife Amy suddenly disappears. The police suspect Nick. Amy’s friends reveal that she was afraid of him, that she kept secrets from him. He swears it isn’t true. A police examination of his computer shows strange searches. He says they weren’t made by him. And then there are the persistent calls on his mobile phone.

So what did happen to Nick’s beautiful wife?

Plot Overview:

Because of financial difficulties and the ailment of Nick’s mother, he and his wife Amy – who’s marriage has declined into friction and miscommunication – move to Missouri where the the tension between the couple only gets worse.
Then on their fifth anniversary, Amy goes missing.
The story told through Nick’s inner monologue and Amy’s Diary entries.

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Book Review: Carrie

Title: Carrie
Author: Stephen King
Rating: 
Genre: Horror, Fiction, Paranormal
Pages: 242
Published by: Hodder & Stoughton
Format: Paperback
Source: Personal Purchase

Goodreads Synopsis:

Carrie knew she should not use the terrifying power she possessed… But one night at her senior prom, Carrie was scorned and humiliated just one time too many, and in a fit of uncontrollable fury she turned her clandestine game into a weapon of horror and destruction…

 

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Book Review: Thirteen Reasons Why

Title: Thirteen Reasons Why
Author: Jay Asher
Rating: 
Genre: Fiction, Contemporary, Mystery, Young Adult
Pages: 297
Published by: Penguin
First Published: January 1st, 2007
Format: Paperback
Source: Personal Purchase

Goodreads Synopsis:

You can’t stop the future.

You can’t rewind the past.

The only way to learn the secret is to press play.

Clay Jensen returns home to find a strange package with his name on it. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker – his classmate and first love – who committed suicide two weeks earlier.

Hannah’s voice explains there are thirteen reasons why she killed herself. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out why.

All through the night, Clay keeps listening – and what he discovers changes his life… forever.

Plot Overview:

Trigger warning for suicide, depression, sexual assault. 

Basically, Hannah Baker committed suicide, but before that she arrange for a box of cassette tapes to be sent to thirteen people. Each person has cassette side dedicated to them where Hannah tells the story of how they tie in with her suicide. The tapes are to be passed on to those mentioned in the tapes or a second tape would be sent out to the public and with it their secrets.
Clay Jensen is on those tapes and he doesn’t know why.

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Book Review: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

Title: Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage
Author: Haruki Murakami
Rating: 
Genre: Japanese Literature, Fiction
Pages: 298
Published by: Harvill Secker
First Published: 2013
Format: Hardback
Source: Personal Purchase 

Goodreads Synopsis:

Tsukuru Tazaki had four best friends at school. By chance all of their names contained a colour. The two boys were called Akamatsu, meaning ‘red pine’, and Oumi, ‘blue sea’, while the girls’ names were Shirane, ‘white root’, and Kurono, ‘black field’. Tazaki was the only last name with no colour in it.

One day Tsukuru Tazaki’s friends announced that they didn’t want to see him, or talk to him, ever again.

Since that day Tsukuru has been floating through life, unable to form intimate connections with anyone. But then he meets Sara, who tells him that the time has come to find out what happened all those years ago.

Plot Overview:

Tsukuru Tazaki was one of five close friends in his highschool years. Then one day,in his college years, they cut Tsukuru off completely, somberly saying they don’t want to see him again. They don’t say why and Tsukuru doesn’t dare ask. After this incedent Tsukuru just drifts through life, never really forming any solid bonds with anyone. He even goes through a stage of depression. Trigger warning for depression and some adult content. Years later, after his friends cut him off and after his stage of depression, it stills plagues Tsukuru why his close friend would treat him in such a way.

Sarah, the woman Tsukuru is seeing, urges his to find closure by finding out what happened all those years ago.

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Book Review: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

Title: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
Author: Ransom Riggs
Rating:  
Genre: Young-Adult, Paranormal,Fiction, Mystery
Pages: 352
Published: 7th June, 2011
Published by: Quirk Books
Format: Paperback
Source: Personal Purchase

Goodreads Synopsis: A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of very curious photographs.It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

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